Marin Luxury Homes (March 2010)

March 29, 2010

Marin County, California’s luxury home market continues to recover from the wasteland of late 2008 and early 2009 when it seemed as though the luxury home market would never recover. Yet, as reported in previous months, real buyers continue to snap up homes in prestige locations such as Belvedere, Ross, Kent Woodlands, etc., along with “value” properties with undeniable upside. In the $2 million to $4 million price band, sales are up 300% over last year and inventory is down 25% — this combination of factors looks promising for continued improvement. For a detailed snapshot of current national trends from the Institute for Luxury Home Marketing, click HERE.

$2 Million to $4 Million Luxury Homes

The $2 million to $4 million price band  remains volatile with prices down 17% over the past 2 years. Despite this obvious and well-noted trend, many sellers have not adjusted their asking prices to reflect market realities. As noted in my columns over the past two years, a seller’s refusal to price correctly at the outset of the listing period is the single greatest mistake possible. Often, listing agents are willing accomplices however because they will “say anything” to obtain the listing. However, bottom line costs to sellers is very significant. I have developed a chart that show exactly just how bad it gets over time when Marin County sellers and their agents) overprice their homes — please call or e-mail me for a copy.

[Click HERE for the rest of the article, courtesy of www.ImagineMarin.com.]

Marin Luxury Report (Febuary 2010)

March 29, 2010

Marin County, California’s luxury home market continues to recover from the proverbial wasteland of late 2008 and early 2009 when it seemed as though the luxury home market would never recover. Yet, as reported in previous months, real buyers continue to snap up homes in prestige locations such as Belvedere, Ross, Kent Woodlands, etc. Indeed, “value” properties are gobbled up quickly. Despite this apparent thirst for luxury digs, inventory levels remain 40% higher than two years ago. This trend is not unique to Marin, but prevails nationwide. For a detailed snapshot of current national trends from the Institute for Luxury Home Marketing, click HERE.

The below chart reflects the number of homes in the $2 million to $4 million luxury price band which are in escrow (compared against the past 2 years). Note that the number of homes with accepted offers (not closed sales), is up 50% from 2 years ago and 450% from last year. This is a promising trend.

Another statistic that may not be readily apparent to casual observers is the fact that prices in the $2 million to $4 million price band are stabilizing as median sales prices countywide are down just 6% over the past 2 years. Of course, the impact of the downturn varies greatly by neighborhood and even within neighborhoods based on amenities.

[Click here for the rest of the article, courtesy of ImagineMarin.com.]

Marin Luxury Report (January 2010)

March 29, 2010

Marin County, California’s luxury home market continues to recover from the wasteland of late 2008 and early 2009 when it seemed as though the luxury home market would never recover. Yet, as reported in previous months, real buyers continue to snap up homes in prestige locations such as Belvedere, Ross, Kent Woodlands, etc., along with “value” properties with undeniable upside. In the $2 million to $4 million price band, sales are up 300% over last year and inventory is down 25% — this combination of factors looks promising for continued improvement. For a detailed snapshot of current national trends from the Institute for Luxury Home Marketing, click HERE.

$2 Million to $4 Million Luxury Homes

The $2 million to $4 million price band  remains volatile with prices down 17% over the past 2 years. Despite this obvious and well-noted trend, many sellers have not adjusted their asking prices to reflect market realities. As noted in my columns over the past two years, a seller’s refusal to price correctly at the outset of the listing period is the single greatest mistake possible. Often, listing agents are willing accomplices however because they will “say anything” to obtain the listing. However, bottom line costs to sellers is very significant. I have developed a chart that show exactly just how bad it gets over time when Marin County sellers and their agents) overprice their homes — please call or e-mail me for a copy.

[Click HERE for the rest of the article, courtesy of www.ImagineMarin.com.]

Marin Real Estate (March 2010)

March 29, 2010

The Marin County, California real estate market continues evidencing traction. Year over year prices seem to have leveled in most price segments and locations within Marin — some areas have even seen prices increase (albeit nominally). Countywide supply and demand figures suggest an improving real estate environment. Supply is down 26% and sales of 3 bedroom, 2 bath homes with at least 1,500 square feet and priced under $1 million,  are up an incredible 75% from February 2009. Nearly all recent statistics point to an improved sales environment in 2010.

[Click HERE for the rest of the article, courtesy of www.NorthBayRE.com.]

Marin Real Estate (February 2010)

March 29, 2010

The Marin County, California real estate market, which entered the new year with momentum, seems to have achieved traction. While year over year prices are down in many price segments and locations within Marin, some areas have actually seen prices increase (albeit nominally). Indeed, countywide supply and demand figures suggest an improving real estate environment as supply is down 24% and sales are up 29%, compared with last year (the numbers are for homes with at least 3 beds, 2 baths, 1,500 square feet, and priced under $1 million).

Marin County (Supply and Demand 2-10)

Much of the apparent strength evident today stems from the red-hot Novato market.

[Click HERE for the rest of the article, courtesy of www.NorthBayRE.com.]

Marin Real Estate (January 2010)

March 29, 2010

We are approached daily by our clients with requests to predict what will happen in our local real estate markets in the near future. To shape our perspective, Morgan Lane researched Marin County single family home (SFH) sales and indexed them (on a units-sold basis) to multiple benchmarks including: interest rates (10 Year T-bill), unemployment (SF Bay Area) and an affordability index (income vs. cost of ownership). We continue to struggle to find direct correlation between Marin County real estate and these available indices.
We have found a relationship worth noting between the total number of Marin County SFH (supply), the total reported sales (demand) and the annual rate of appreciation (%). The chart below illustrates the following: Supply, since 1999, increased an average of only .38% per year; Demand (closed sales) averages 2,352 units, or 3.62% of total supply; Appreciation averaged 6.50% over the past eleven years but has decreased -.35% over the past five years.
[Click HERE for the rest of the article, courtesy of www.NorthBayRE.com.]

Mill Valley CA. Real Estate Market Report (March 2010 Home Sales Update)

March 15, 2010

The number of home sales in the Mill Valley, California real estate market held exactly even in February — 16 trades (February usually has lower sales totals because it is a short month with two legal holidays and bcause January tends to have weather which limits buyer activity). Based on last month’s total sales, we currently have an overall inventory of homes sufficient to last 5.1 months (absorption rate). This number is higher than last month because of the large number of homes that came on the market very recently. As discussed below, however, our touchstone price band is performing very well. 

Mill Valley Home Sales February 2010

Insofar as the sales and apsorption rate of Mill Valley’s touchstone price band ($1 million to $ 2million) are concerned, the market appears to be striding towards normalcy. As indicated above, compared with the past 2 years’ February totals, sales are up 50% over 2008 and double that of 2009. Meanwhile, the chart below shows a market with a serious increase in sales velocity — there is barely 3 months’ inventory for homes priced in the touchstone price band. This is a big reduction from the absorption rate from May 2009, which stood at well over 8 months.

mv-march-2010-absorption-rate

Indeed, although we are at the precipice of the traditional selling season, the number of homes for sale in Mill Valley remains low at 82. We still believe that many “real buyers” stand poised to act on the right property. Certainly, the media’s negative feedback loop seems to have reversed itself as most mainstream economy-related articles seem to be more positive in nature as consumer spending has increased. Certainly, investors are “flipping” homes again! Mill Valley’s entry level price band (under $800,000) is as strong as it has been in recent history — with 54% of homes currently in escrow. Below is a table detailing the number of homes in escrow in each price band:

Price Range

Total Active Homes

Pending Listings

Up to $800K

11

54%

$800K – $1 mil.

20

23%

$1 mil. – 1.5 mil.

20

31%

$1.5 mil. – $2 mil.

13

35%

$2 mil. & Up

18

10%

Mill Valley’s 16 sales in February 2010 gave rise to the following averages: 102 days on the market; an average price of $1,552,422; and about 2,886 sq. ft. (or about $545 per sq. ft.).

Homes in Tam Valley, Scott Valley, Sycamore Park, and Country Club generated the most calls this month. If you would like more information about neighborhoods, sales, schools, or local Mill Valley services references, just give me a call at (415) 350-9440 or e-mail me at Kyle@MillValley101.com.

p.s. I currently have several clients who want to be sellers, but are waiting in the wings. Please contact me to determine if any of these opportunities fit your needs. If you would like my Mill Valley Hot List, call or e-mail me: (415) 350-9440 | Kyle@MillValley101.com. It is always my pleasure to be of service. Christie’s Great Estates | Morgan Lane Marin | Pacific Union International.